Bellwether Header Logo
Page 1 of 6
  • Thumbnail image for blog post Reflection from Farmer Kyle: Maple Sugaring .
    Reflection from Farmer Kyle: Maple Sugaring

    One way we are savoring the winter this year at Bellwether Farm is by making maple syrup. Tapping into a wintry tradition that goes all the way back to the indigenous peoples of North America, we’ve been collecting maple sap from the trees on our property.

    Posted
  • Bellwether Farm: A Year in Review

    Bellwether Farm welcomed more than 1,950 guests from 79 different organizations from all across the country in 2019. We served at least 15,630 individual meals, with every meal having at least one item that was produced on-site. There were 159 nights with guests staying in the retreat rooms or camp cabins. Fourteen parishes hosted their own retreats. We had 189 campers from 17 different counties. We awarded 64 campers $22,206 in scholarship money so that they could attend summer camp. We grew 43 different vegetables and harvested around 7,190 pounds of produce. We collected around 9,575 eggs. We had 11 baby goats and five lambs born in 2019. Vo

    Posted
  • Thumbnail image for blog post Our First Season of Summer Camp.
    Our First Season of Summer Camp

    Bellwether Farm held its first season of summer camp this year! More than 175 youth, ages 5-18, attended over the five week span. Campers were engaged in programming that taught them about healthy social, nutritional, and environmental practices while immersed in God's beautiful creation from morning until night. Let's take a look at some of what campers experienced this summer.

    Posted
  • Thumbnail image for blog post Extending Curriculums Outdoors.
    Extending Curriculums Outdoors

    Bellwether Farm is working on creating educational partnerships with schools, 4-H groups, and other groups interested in experiencing what we have to offer on our 137-acre property.

    Posted
  • Thumbnail image for blog post
    "Pick Your Own Veggies" Days

    What would the soil be like at Bellwether Farm? That was the question I asked myself all winter while I waited for the snow to melt and reveal the hidden earth beneath it. I’d seen the soil test and knew it needed a lot of love and care, namely in the form of organic matter (e.g. compost). However, it’s really hard to know how things are going to grow until you’ve had a year of experience on a particular piece of land. Three months in, with the help of lots of volunteers and a giant mountain of compost, I’m happy to say we have an abundance of vegetables in this inaugural farm season at Bellwether Farm!

    Posted
Page 1 of 6